March 14, 2017

Looking Forward: JLPA•MP Board of Directors Passes Inclusion Statement

Looking Forward: JLPA•MP Board of Directors Passes Inclusion Statement
This fall, the JLPA•MP Board of Directors approved the League’s first formal Inclusion Statement. We went behind the scenes to learn about the process that brought this statement to life and what it means for our League. What follows are excerpts from a conversation between Communications Committee Member Chiara Sani and Board Member-At-Large Michelle Rodriguez Flores, who chairs the ad-hoc Diversity and Inclusion Committee and is a Diversity and Inclusion Program Manager at VMware.
What was the genesis of the Inclusion Statement?
The Association of Junior Leagues International (AJLI) has been empowering Leagues to become more inclusive and has provided great resources and guidance to our League. The inclusion message sent by AJLI really resonated with JLPA•MP President Sara Hollister, who reached out to me because of my professional work in this field. Sara is a leader with a vision and she is very passionate about inclusion. Within our League there has been a lot interest in and many conversations on the subject.
What were the next steps?
Last year the JLPA•MP Board decided to create an ad-hoc committee to work on inclusion strategy. Because of my passion for the subject and my years of professional experience, the Board invited me to work on the inclusion strategy for the JLPA•MP.
Can you tell us more about why this process is important now?
The JLPA•MP is a very welcoming group, but we are still faced with the stereotype of what a woman in the League does or looks like. Rolling out a JLPA•MP inclusion strategy is an important step toward reflecting the reality of our League, retaining great members, as well as, recruiting new members who can feel they are part of an organization that values their roots, background and experiences.

So the Inclusion Statement is about diversity? Can you elaborate?
In other words, diversity is making sure we have the best mix of members that reflects our broader community and inclusion is making sure that the diversity mix works. We have to make sure that our environment is as inclusive as possible so that any woman who wants to contribute to our League can bring her full self, talents and leadership to make our League the best it can be.
Now that the Board has passed the Inclusion Statement, what are the next steps?
The strategy and the new Inclusion Statement were presented at the January General Membership Meeting. The Diversity and Inclusion Committee will now leverage other groups within the League, to facilitate a strategic roll out. The goal will be making inclusion an integral part of what the League promotes, values and reflects, in all its aspects. The Board of Directors and the ad-hoc Diversity and Inclusion Committee have a clear vision of how inclusion will improve how our League reflects and mirrors the demographics of our community.

September 12, 2016

The Junior League of Palo Alto•Mid Peninsula grants over $30,000 to local Non-Profits

Menlo Park, Calif. – Each year, Junior League of Palo Alto-Mid Peninsula (JLPA•MP) supports local non-profits by funding new programs or specialized training for those in need. As part of its community focus on empowering girls in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math), the 2016 grant awards selection criteria was based on relevance to this 2016 focus area. The committee members worked diligently to ensure all applications were carefully reviewed and considered for relevance to our focus area and League bylaws. After narrowing down the applications to six, the committee members then vetted the final proposals and presented to the board to vote.

16 local non-profit organizations submitted applications to the JLPA-MP and three distinct and worthy organizations were awarded this year’s grants:


Charlie Cart Project

Erica Wehrs conducted research and presented the grant proposal for Encinal Elementary, which was awarded $11,000 to launch the Charlie Cart Project. Charlie Cart is an educational program that connects lessons in Math and Science with Food and Cooking.

The Mouse Squad

Robin Hindry Enan researched and presented the proposal for The Mouse Squad, which was awarded $10,000 to help fund attendance for over 100 girls in grades 7-10 to Oracle’s Annual Dare 2B Digital Conference in February 2017.

The Tech Museum

Beth Greenberg researched and presented the Tech Museum proposal, which was awarded $10,000 to fund a toolkit for parents who are interested in fostering their daughter’s interest in STEM.

More information on the Community Grants process can be found at JLPA-MP Grants.

Celebrating 50 Years of Community Impact

Since its founding in 1965, the Junior League of Palo Alto•Mid Peninsula has contributed thousands of volunteer hours to the local community, supported nearly 100 community service projects, and awarded grants to 192 area nonprofit organizations. In its 50 years, the League has tackled important social issues such as affordable housing, societal violence, literacy and education, homelessness, drug addiction, and at-risk children and youth.

The League has also played a key role in starting several local nonprofits, including The Tech Museum of Innovation, Daybreak Shelter, The Stanford Health Library, Rebuilding Together Peninsula, East Palo Alto Charter School, and Rosalie Rendu Center.

Additionally, delegates from JLPA•MP participate in the State Public Affairs Committee of the Junior Leagues of California (SPAC), a non-partisan education and advocacy organization representing more than 11,000 women voters. SPAC’s efforts have resulted in passage of two critical bills dealing with domestic violence (Senate Bill 563) and health care (Assembly Bill 40).

About the Junior League of Palo Alto•Mid Peninsula, Inc.

The Junior League of Palo Alto•Mid Peninsula, Inc. (JLPA•MP) is an organization of women committed to promoting voluntarism, developing the potential of women and improving communities through the effective action and leadership of trained volunteers. The JLPA•MP serves the Peninsula communities of Atherton, Belmont, East Palo Alto, Foster City, Los Altos, Los Altos Hills, Menlo Park, Mountain View, Palo Alto, Portola Valley, Redwood City, San Carlos, Stanford, Sunnyvale and Woodside, and invites women of all races, religions and national origins who demonstrate an interest in and commitment to voluntarism to join our ranks. For more information, visit www.thejuniorleague.org.

July 19, 2016


by Shelly Welch

Last week, I had the fortune of being invited to attend Technovation's World Pitch Summit Awards 2016 Ceremony. I was escorted from the sign-in table to a room full of large poster board displays and people milling around them. A young woman introduced herself. "I'm Grace," she showed me her ambassador badge.
She told me that she's a university student from Nigeria and asked me if I'd ever attended one of these events before.  I told her I hadn't, so she walked me to a table with a team from Cameroon, Africa.

A girl in traditional dress began to show me local agricultural products. She did her best to explain that her group was helping to connect regional farmers with the global marketplace. The whole Cameroon team learned English specifically to present their app in this competition. 

We walked to the other side of the room, where I saw an app called "OOL" by a girl from Mexico that connects volunteers with NGOs (non-governmental organizations). This app ended up winning the main prize in the high school division. Another app, "Loc8Don8", came from a local Bay Area team that compiles donation locations into one handy app, encouraging people to donate their extra stuff. This team won for the middle school division.

What stuck with me most is the simplicity of Technovation's premise: to tell girls "you are capable of changing the world" and here are some tools and coaches to guide you along the way.

What these girls create are mobile apps that do astounding things: help connect volunteers with nonprofits, reduce food waste in homes and on farms, educate their peers about self-acceptance, answer questions about sex, and what to do after high school.

I asked Grace how she came to be involved with Technovation. She told me that her team had won the previous year by creating an app for a garbage pickup service. She told me that with her app, people could call garbage carriers to pick up their garbage  or could report garbage in the street to be picked up by sending photos and locations. 

Grace asked me, "How did you become acquainted with this group?" I sold the League very simply, "I'm part of a organization that helps get girls into careers in technology and science." Her eyes lit up. "We're very glad to have you here."

January 19, 2016

Innovative Collaboration of Community Partners for The Tech Challenge Learning How To Soar

Innovative Collaboration of Community Partners for The Tech Challenge
Learning How To Soar
By Nan Acharya, Co-Chair / Tech Challenge

Displaying IMG_4924.jpgOn November 17th, 2015, the Junior League of Palo Alto Mid-Peninsula, in cooperation with the Tech Museum of Innovation, San Jose and two peninsula schools, Synapse School and Charter Connect, launched its signature Girls in STEM project with a training for girls and League volunteers on the Tech Challenge. The Tech Challenge Committee (co-chaired by Kate Thome and Nandini Acharya) was on hand to welcome 15 League women, representatives from the Tech Museum and girls in grades 3-5 from Synapse School and Charter Connect. The purpose of the event was two-fold, to introduce the girls to the Tech Challenge and to train the League and parent mentors on how to best guide and encourage the girls (without doing the work for them!).

Displaying IMG_4906.jpgFirst, Abby Longcor, Director of the Tech Challenge at the Tech Museum reviewed with the girls how the challenge works, the timeline, the theme (flight!) and core requirements. Ms. Longcor emphasized the importance of planning and the role of experimentation and trial and error (emphasis on having fun and not being afraid to try out innovative ideas). The Tech Museum even set up a mock version of the test course to help the girls visualize the event. After reviewing the guidelines for the Challenge and answering some great questions from the girls, the girls engaged in a hand- on mini challenge involving creating a flying object and shepherding "Ant-man"in it across a short course. It was fantastic to see the interest sparked in the girls and the enthusiasm with which they embarked on the mini-challenge. Afterwards, the girls were given the opportunity to form teams and sign up to participate.

Displaying IMG_4915.jpgThe second half of the evening involved an engaging session again led by Ms. Longcor designed to prepare the League and parent volunteers to take on the role of an effective Tech Challenge team mentor. Ms. Longcor reviewed techniques and strategies to engage the girls, spark innovation and creativity, help them organize and project-plan but let them do the creative and scientific work. All in all, it was a fantastic event and the League, the Tech Challenge Committee and the schools are poised to launch weekly mentoring sessions at Synapse School for the girls starting in January and running through the Tech Challenge Day on April 23, 2016 at the Tech Museum. The League will underwrite the entrance and participation costs and purchase supplies for the girls. We can't wait to take flight!

January 15, 2016

Feature Friday: Vicki Clark

Not only is Vicki Clark the guest speaker at next week's GMM but also today’s #jlpamp_FeatureFriday!!

Vicki Clark, Organization Development Consultant/Trainer will be speaking about Diversity and Social & Cultural Inclusion. As one of the 7 elements of civic and community leadership for women in Junior Leagues, it is important for League members to continue to develop their skills, attitudes and knowledge in this area and move toward individual and organizational cultural competence. 

Here is more about Vicki:

How long have you been a consultant/trainer: I have been an independent trainer and consultant since 2002.  I provide training, consulting, speaking and writing and work with nonprofit, business and government groups. Looking back, the majority of my work in the business and nonprofit sector involved training others and leadership development.

Favorite part of your job: Getting to meet passionate, amazing, thoughtful people who want to change lives and communities and make the world a better place.

How many years you have worked with Junior League: I began training with Junior Leagues in 2000 during AJLIs 100th Anniversary.

How many Leagues have you spoken to? Have no idea. Have been fortunate to have had the opportunity to work with a great many Leagues. Have provided training and consultation to Leagues in 47 states, in Canada and London League.

Any Non-Profit/ Foundation positions: Currently on the boards of two national non-profit organizations:  National Diaper Bank Network and Youth Volunteer Corps.

Hobbies: Movies/Theatre

Favorite vacation spot: HOME. I travel for work 300 days a year and home is my vacation spot.

Where is home? Memphis, TN.  Have also lived in St. Louis, Chicago, Washington, D.C. and Houston

Fun Fact: I was queen of my Kindergarten class.  I am an only child of an only child.

December 11, 2015

#jlpamp_FeatureFriday: Naomi Chavez Peters

Today our #jlpamp_FeatureFriday is Naomi Chavez Peters, Membership Council Sustaining Advisor & also Presenter at the AJLI conferences (OD Institute Membership Track Leader and Winter Conference presenter).
Naomi became a provisional member in 1993.  Active until 2007 & Sustaining member ever since.

Goal for this League Year: 
  • Serve Mikel and the Membership council with their goals and initiatives.
  • Support leadership development initiatives within our League and other Leagues.
Favorite past Placements: 
  • Community VP.  We brought in a new focus area at the time (focusing on families) and we brought back hands-on relational projects like the Rosalie Rendu Center project, Friends for Youth, Survive Alive House.  
  • President, 2005-2006:  an incredible year.  Really tested my leadership capability, but it was hands-down the best executive development money cannot buy.  Very proud of what the League and my board accomplished with our theme, “The Power of WE."
Most memorable league events:
  • Co-chairing the provisional (now called “new member”) committee with Mary Johnson.  She was such an esteemed active member at the time, I could not believe I was chosen to co-chair with her.  We had a bumper crop of new members that year, which included 3 future presidents:  Meaux Costello, Stefanie Bruggeman and Jan Woolsey.  I loved my committee of mentors, and of course I was beyond proud of the accomplishments of the new members that year.
  • Winning the $10K AJLI/ Anheuser Busch “Fund for the Future” award at AJLI Annual Conference for our Risk Management plan.  We did this following the tragedy that hit other Leagues with Hurricane Katrina in 2006.  Thanks to the great foundational work done by past-President Sally Falkenhagen, we shared our plan, which has become a standard by which AJLI today advises other Leagues to be prepared for the unexpected.  And thanks to Stacey Wueste Davis, my board member-at-large (and another of my esteemed provisionals) who spearheaded the award effort.  With her in charge, I knew we would win….

Born/Raised in: Merced California

Employment:  Founder and Principal, Great Leader Consulting, LLC.  Thanks to the successful side-business I created supporting Junior Leagues across the association, I finally got the courage to hang my own shingle!  My firm focuses on talent development and leadership development strategies for both for-profit and non-profit organizations. 

Other Non-Profit/ Foundation positions:
  • Board member:  Children’s Health Council (serving with Rahela Abbas and Calla Griffith)
  • Member:  Stanford Medicine Community Council (serving with Linda Meier, Maggie Pringle and Bren Leisure)
  • Advisory Board member:  Sky’s the Limit Fund (serving with Rochelle Bochner, Lani Dorff and Debbie Eastburn)

Favorite way to spend free time: 
  • Getting back into shape after 5 years of commuting from Los Gatos to San Francisco 4-5 days a week. 
  • Community service
Favorite vacation spot: Stay-cation.  Or anywhere in Europe.
  

Favorite local restaurant: Nick’s Next Door in Los Gatos.


Fun Fact: After watching the movie, “The Way” and being inspired by Karen Miller from the Junior League of Evanston IL, I’m training to walk the Camino de Santiago.  I’m up for the pilgrimage, after 31 years working in high tech growth companies.  

November 19, 2015

Fundraising Training: The Art of the Ask

by: Shelly Welch

Most of us have been in this situation at some point in our tenure in the Junior League or perhaps for our or our kids' schools: We need raffle prizes. We are going to ask people. We think we're prepared. We have handouts and information. Will anyone give anything to us for our cause? Will it be okay?

We couldn't have asked for a better group to share stories and advice. Moderated by Jacquetta Lannan, our panel consisted of Joanne Pasternak (JLPA-MP Sustainer, Executive Director, 49ers Foundation), Carrie Drake (Director of Donor Relations and Major Gifts at Sempervirens Fund and JLPA-MP Sustainer and Fundraising Council Advisor, Past President), Suzi Tinsley (JLPA-MP Sustainer and Past Gala Fundraising Co-Chair, Past President), Kristin Fabos Livingston (JLPA-MP Sustainer, Past Fund Development Chair and Executive Director, SeniorNet), and Ashley Cash (Development Officer, Silicon Valley Community Foundation).

Consider the first scenario, soliciting for a raffle prize or a sponsorship. It came up right at the end of our Q&A portion, asked by one of our attendees. Joanne Pasternak went right to work, throwing out suggestions and asking questions: Add value to your ask by saying you'll include their business in a directory given out to all the event participants if they donate, it doesn't have to be much. Just a photocopy of business cards handed out to attendees. How about telling them that you've spoken to their neighbors and list what they've given? And then ask them to refer you to other businesses, whether the answer is yes or no.

Our panel taught us that instead of asking "Who would give to our cause?"  we are more likely to get good results when we ask, "How do I make a yes possible?"

Cover your basics. Do your research. Make a value proposition about why your donor will want to give something to you. Craft your ask to fit in with a group's mission. Get a foot in the door, however small. If you're making a corporate ask, follow the rules of the ask. You can find those on an organization's website. Be professional, succinct, and to the point.  

Create relationships and connections. There are quite a few tools to open up a conversation. Suzi learns a person's favorite candy. Joanne immediately finds things she has in common with another person. Once you have a foot in the door, listen. Some asks are immediate, some require a few phone calls or meetings. It's easy to list off reasons why a person should give to your cause, and to make your points. Creating connections requires that you pay attention a what things your donors are passionate about. You never know, a no may only be a no for now, but there will be another opportunity somewhere down the line. 

Never underestimate the infectiousness of enthusiasm. Suzi's favorite ask was her first. She was selling tickets for our Pancake Breakfast. She went with a friend, who made her ask quietly and got no response. The silence created a vacuum which Suzi filled with her bubbly and inviting personality. "Hi! Would you like to come to our Pancake Breakfast? Bring your whole family! Your daughter is on my daughter's soccer team. Why don't we bring the whole team!" Her enthusiasm is infectious, like you get to be part of her big, fun party. If you are excited about your ask, you invite others to get excited, too. 

Be creative. Creativity in asking is like creativity in anything; it requires experience and finesse. Keep your eyes open. Look for stories. A good story is powerful because it can connect potential donors to your cause in ways that facts and figures may not be able. Keep an eye open for potential connections. Use social media. Take pictures and use video and post them where your donors can see them and get involved. There are many ways to ask someone to sponsor your your event. Think of creative ways to use your event to create new business for your sponsor. It can be as easy as handing out a list of sponsors and their contact information to event attendees or as complicated as doing a bus tour of sites and programs that your organization supports. 

Show gratitude more often than you ask for things. A lot can be accomplished by something as simple as a hand-written thank you note. Think about it. Would you that an organization only send you a Tax ID letter? Personal touches matter. In a league where we change roles yearly, it's important for us to think of ourselves as stewards for future years. "Think long-term," says Carrie. Any stewardship you do paves the way for the next person to make an ask." 


September 25, 2015

15th Annual Menlo Park Pancake Breakfast Benefits Burn Victims

 


Menlo Park, CA – Sept. 21, 2015 – One of the community’s favorite events, the 15th annual Pancake Breakfast will be held on Saturday, October 3 at the Menlo Park Fire District Headquarters at 300 Middlefield Road.

This popular annual event, co-sponsored by the Junior League of Palo Alto•Mid Peninsula (JLPA•MP), the Menlo Park Firefighters Association, the Menlo Park Fire Protection District, the Stanford Park Hotel and the Menlo Grill Bistro & Bar, benefits the Alisa Ann Ruch Burn Foundation. Volunteers will be flipping pancakes and serving breakfast at the fire station from 7:30 to 11 a.m. that morning.

Advance ticket purchase is not required; a suggested donation of $10 per adult and $5 per child will be requested at the door.

The event includes something for guests of all ages. Breakfast will feature pancakes cooked to perfection by the Menlo Park Firefighters, delicious Hobee’s coffee cake and Peet’s Coffee. Junior League volunteers are organizing several fun activities for kids. The Fire District will host a silent auction featuring items such as a visit with “Old Tom,” their antique fire truck at your birthday party or event, dinner at Menlo Grill Bistro & Bar, and a night stay at the Stanford Park Hotel.

“The Pancake Breakfast and open house at the fire station is a family favorite every year,” said Fire Marshal Jon Johnston of the Menlo Park Fire District. “It’s a pleasure to partner with the Junior League and other local community organizations to raise money for this worthy cause.”

“We’re honored to support the Alisa Ann Ruch Burn Foundation in their life-changing work with burn survivors,” said Jan Hickman, JLPA•MP President. “As the Junior League celebrates 50 years of volunteer service in the community, we look forward to this fun and important annual event.”

Last year’s breakfast raised approximately $8,000 for the Alisa Ann Ruche Burn Foundation, and organizers hope to top that number this year. Proceeds from the event help the foundation provide much-needed programs for burn survivors in California. In 2010, the Foundation worked closely with local hospitals handling burn victims of the San Bruno fire.

Junior League Celebrates 50 Years of Community Impact

Since its founding in 1965, the Junior League of Palo Alto•Mid Peninsula has contributed thousands of volunteer hours to the local community, supported nearly 100 community service projects, and awarded grants to 192 area nonprofit organizations. In its 50 years, the League has tackled important social issues such as affordable housing, societal violence, literacy and education, homelessness, drug addiction, and at-risk children and youth.

The League has also played a key role in starting several local nonprofits, including The Tech Museum of Innovation, Daybreak Shelter, The Stanford Health Library, Rebuilding Together Peninsula, East Palo Alto Charter School, and Rosalie Rendu Center.

Additionally, delegates from JLPA•MP participate in the State Public Affairs Committee of the Junior Leagues of California (SPAC), a non-partisan education and advocacy organization representing more than 11,000 women voters. SPAC’s efforts have resulted in passage of two critical bills dealing with domestic violence (Senate Bill 563) and health care (Assembly Bill 40).

About the Junior League of Palo Alto•Mid Peninsula, Inc.
The Junior League of Palo Alto•Mid Peninsula, Inc. (JLPA•MP) is an organization of women committed to promoting voluntarism, developing the potential of women and improving communities through the effective action and leadership of trained volunteers. The JLPA•MP serves the Peninsula communities of Atherton, Belmont, East Palo Alto, Foster City, Los Altos, Los Altos Hills, Menlo Park, Mountain View, Palo Alto, Portola Valley, Redwood City, San Carlos, Stanford, Sunnyvale and Woodside, and invites women of all races, religions and national origins who demonstrate an interest in and commitment to voluntarism to join our ranks. For more information, visit www.thejuniorleague.org.

About the Menlo Park Firefighters Association
The Menlo Park Firefighters Association exists to protect, improve and preserve the lives of the citizens of the fire district and the members of the Firefighters Association. The motto of the Menlo Park Firefighters Association is "Our Family Helping Your Family." www.mpffa.org

About the Menlo Park Fire District
Formed in 1915, the Menlo Park Fire Protection District is located in the southern most part of San Mateo County. The Fire District covers the communities of Atherton, Menlo Park and East Palo Alto and some unincorporated areas of San Mateo County. The District has seven stations that are strategically placed to provide the most efficient response times. The District responds to approximately 8,500 emergencies a year with about 60% of them being emergency medical incidents.



June 26, 2015

Junior League of Palo Alto•Mid Peninsula and The Tech Museum of Innovation Partner to Promote Girls in Tech

Junior League Marks 50th Anniversary with $100,000 Grant to The Tech Museum

Menlo Park, Calif. – The Junior League of Palo Alto•Mid Peninsula (JLPA•MP) is partnering with The Tech Museum of Innovation to encourage girls in technology, part of a new community focus area for the League. The Tech Museum, founded by JLPA•MP in 1976, will benefit from a $100,000 grant in celebration of the League’s 50th anniversary, as well as significant volunteer and outreach support over the next three years.

One joint project will provide funding to establish "Girls @ The Tech Days," a new program focused on engaging girls with STEM education and educating teachers to support them. Girls will participate in hands-on workshops, interact with exhibits, and hear from women working in tech today.  Another project will pair JLPA•MP members with middle school girls participating in The Tech Challenge, an annual team design challenge that reinforces the scientific and engineering process. JLPA•MP members will also aid in establishing the Girls @ The Tech Committee, which will help to provide future community and financial support for the museum. 

"The Tech is enormously grateful for the support provided by the JLPA•MP," said Jessica Christie, Director of Individual Giving at The Tech. "Without their efforts the museum would not exist, and their renewed support will allow us to focus on the crucial issue of inspiring girls to connect with STEM."

“Getting and Keeping Girls in Technology” emerged as a pressing issue in Silicon Valley as a result of a community needs assessment conducted by JLPA•MP. The JLPA•MP believes it is uniquely qualified to make an impact on the issue due to its location, membership, and mission. 

"We are thrilled to partner again with The Tech to create new programs that focus on sustained engagement of girls in STEM, an issue we determined critical to our local community," commented Project Development Committee co-chair and immediate past president, Joy Baker Peacock.   

Celebrating 50 Years of Community Impact

Since its founding in 1965, the Junior League of Palo Alto•Mid Peninsula has contributed thousands of volunteer hours to the local community, supported nearly 100 community service projects, and awarded grants to 192 area nonprofit organizations. In its 50 years, the League has tackled important social issues such as affordable housing, societal violence, literacy and education, homelessness, drug addiction, and at-risk children and youth.

The League has also played a key role in starting several local nonprofits, including The Tech Museum of Innovation, Daybreak Shelter, The Stanford Health Library, Rebuilding Together Peninsula, East Palo Alto Charter School, and Rosalie Rendu Center.

Additionally, delegates from JLPA•MP participate in the State Public Affairs Committee of the Junior Leagues of California (SPAC), a non-partisan education and advocacy organization representing more than 11,000 women voters. SPAC’s efforts have resulted in passage of two critical bills dealing with domestic violence (Senate Bill 563) and health care (Assembly Bill 40).

About the Junior League of Palo Alto•Mid Peninsula, Inc.

The Junior League of Palo Alto•Mid Peninsula, Inc. (JLPA•MP) is an organization of women committed to promoting voluntarism, developing the potential of women and improving communities through the effective action and leadership of trained volunteers. The JLPA•MP serves the Peninsula communities of Atherton, Belmont, East Palo Alto, Foster City, Los Altos, Los Altos Hills, Menlo Park, Mountain View, Palo Alto, Portola Valley, Redwood City, San Carlos, Stanford, Sunnyvale and Woodside, and invites women of all races, religions and national origins who demonstrate an interest in and commitment to voluntarism to join our ranks. For more information, visit www.thejuniorleague.org.

About the Tech Museum of Innovation

The Tech is a hands-on technology and science museum for people of all ages and backgrounds. The museum — located in the Capital of Silicon Valley — is a non-profit experiential learning resource established to engage people in exploring and experiencing applied technologies affecting their lives. Through programs such as The Tech Challenge presented by Cisco, our annual team-design competition for youth, and internationally renowned programs such as The Tech Awards presented by Applied Materials, The Tech endeavors to inspire the innovator in everyone.

 

June 18, 2015

Junior League of Palo Alto•Mid Peninsula and Technovation Partner to Bring the World’s Largest Mobile App Startup Competition to More Bay Area Girls



Menlo Park, Calif. – June 22, 2015 – The Junior League of Palo Alto•Mid Peninsula (JLPA•MP) is partnering with Technovation, the world’s largest mobile app entrepreneurship competition for girls, to inspire the next generation of technology leaders. Technovation will benefit from significant volunteer and outreach support from the JLPA•MP as the organizations join forces to educate the female technology entrepreneurs of the future.

In this first joint project between JLPA•MP and Technovation, the organizations will work together to address the shortage of girls who pursue STEM careers. JLPA•MP volunteers will reach out to local teachers, women in technology, and community leaders to educate them about Technovation’s free online curriculum and competition, and equip them to lead Technovation groups in their schools and neighborhoods. JLPA•MP will also provide support to volunteers throughout the competition and organize local events related to the project.

Samantha Quist, JLPA•MP member and the former executive director of Technovation, states, “I’m proud to see JLPA•MP focusing on girls in STEM and working with Technovation to bring mobile app development and entrepreneurship education to more girls in our community.”

Studies have shown that just 18% of computer science majors are women (a decrease from 35% of computer science graduates in 1985), and only 7% of technology entrepreneurs are estimated to be women. JLPA•MP and Technovation aim to improve the ratio of women in computer science and entrepreneurship by providing training and education to young women in Santa Clara and San Mateo counties.

Technovation challenges girls ages 10 to 18 to create a mobile app and business plan to address a real problem in their community. Bay Area students have chosen to address issues including graffiti, bullying, and peer pressure in previous years. The 2015-16 project will begin this fall as teachers, community members, women in technology, and other volunteers register to participate in Technovation. JLPA•MP is excited to collaborate with volunteers and students as they begin work on Technovation’s curriculum by January, in order to prepare their apps for submission to Technovation’s international competition by next spring.
 
About the Junior League of Palo Alto•Mid Peninsula, Inc.

The Junior League of Palo Alto•Mid Peninsula, Inc. (JLPA•MP) is an organization of women committed to promoting voluntarism, developing the potential of women and improving communities through the effective action and leadership of trained volunteers. The JLPA•MP serves the Peninsula communities of Atherton, Belmont, East Palo Alto, Foster City, Los Altos, Los Altos Hills, Menlo Park, Mountain View, Palo Alto, Portola Valley, Redwood City, San Carlos, Stanford, Sunnyvale and Woodside, and invites women of all races, religions and national origins who demonstrate an interest in and commitment to voluntarism to join our ranks. For more information, visit www.thejuniorleague.org.

About Technovation

Technovation’s mission is to inspire and educate girls and women to solve real-world problems through technology. Technovation began as a pilot program in 2010 with just 45 girls. Over the past five years, it has transformed from an in-person program taught by Technovation staff to a global competition reaching thousands of girls in 28 countries. Technovation is a program of Iridescent, a 501c3 non-profit that trains engineers and scientists to mentor young people, inspire them to develop a sense of wonder about the world, and guide them in tackling real world challenges.